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How to Set Up a Rifle Weaver Scope

by Peter Timm

Weaver, maker of rifle scopes, has been producing quality optics since first opening its doors in 1930. The scopes are waterproof, shock resistant and available with variable power settings. Weaver scopes incorporate quality optics for a sight picture that's clear and crisp. A Weaver scope can be quickly mounted; Weaver mounts are pre-installed on most modern rifles. The Weaver line of scopes serves the variety of needs of the modern shooter.

Mounting Your Weaver Scope

Remove the screws from the scope rings and separate the halves.

Place the scope into the rings, replace the top halves and partially tighten the screws so that the scope can still be moved.

Loosen the retention screws holding the mounting bracket at the base of the rings and attach the scope rings to the rail mount.

Adjust the scope position for eye relief and image clarity. Adjust the scope so the cross-hairs appear straight vertically and horizontally.

Tighten the scope rings.

Adjusting Your Weaver Scope

Adjust the scope's cross-hairs to intersect on the rifle's projected point of impact (the spot where the bullet hits the target). Modify the scope's vertical axis by rotating the dial on the right side of the scope clockwise to move the cross-hair left or counterclockwise for right. Change the horizontal cross-hair by rotating the dial on top of the scope clockwise for down, or counterclockwise for up.

Change your scope's power setting by rotating the variable power ring clockwise to increase power or counterclockwise to reduce.

Correct for parallax error by adjusting the objective bell (located at the end of your scope). Parallax error is an optical illusion of target movement or caused by a shooter changing his line of sight. Not all scopes are equipped for parallax correction.

Items you will need

  • Rifle equipped with a Weaver style scope mount
  • Weaver style scope rings

About the Author

Peter Timm has been writing since 2002 for both print and online publications. Timm earned a Bachelor of Arts from the New York Institute of Technology in 2008 and emerged a technically astute writer.