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How to Restore a Pop-Up Camper Trailer

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Restoring a pop-up camper trailer requires hard work. Most of the materials required are available at a local home improvement center or RV center. Fabric stores are a reliable source for clear vinyl fabric used in some pop-up camper trailer windows. Allow for a weekend or two to completely restore the pop-up camper.

Restoring a Pop-Up Camper Trailer

Step 1

Open the pop-up camper and inspect the fabric and windows for leaks, tears, open seams and broken zippers. Mark the areas requiring repair with a pencil.

Step 2

Use a darning needle and nylon thread to secure loose zippers and to repair open or torn seams.

Step 3

Remove the damaged screen and window fabric by opening up the seams with a seam ripper. Lay the damaged piece on to new fabric. Trace the shape and cut out with scissors. Sew the new fabric into place using a darning needle and thread.

Step 4

Use a fabric patch kit to repair leaks and holes in the pop-up camper trailer's fabric. Cut the patch ¼-inch larger than the damaged area. Use the glue included with the kit to secure a patch to the inside and outside of the damaged fabric.

Step 5

Wash the pop-up camper and check for leaks. Allow to dry completely. Spray with a water repellent spray after the camper top has dried. Allow spray to dry.

Step 6

Replace damaged cabinet hardware with new hardware. Check hinges for damage or rust. Replace hinges if necessary. Use household oil to lubricate hard-to-operate hinges.

Step 7

Check cabinets for damaged wood. Fill in dings and nicks with wood putty. Add an updated look to the cabinets with a coat of exterior paint.

Step 8

Use the floor scraper to remove old tile or carpet. Measure the floor space. Purchase enough peel-and-stick tile to cover the area.

Step 9

Replace mattresses with new ones. Upgrade to innerspring or Sleep Number ® beds for a high-end renovation.

Tips

  • Choose a day without wind or rain to apply the water repellent.
  • Purchase 10 percent more tile than you will need. This allows for errors and later repairs.

References

  • "Woodall's RV Owners Handbook"; Woodall's Publishing Corp.; 2005 edition

About the Author

Lynda Altman started writing professionally in 2001, specializing in genealogy, home-schooling, gardening, animals and crafts. Her work has appeared in "Family Chronicle Magazine" and "Chihuahua Magazine." Altman holds a B.A. in marketing from Mercy College, a black belt in taekwondo, master gardener certification, a certificate in graphic arts and a certificate in genealogy.

Photo Credits

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