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How to Remodel a Class A RV

by Lynda Altman
Class A RVs are the luxury liners of the road.

Class A RVs are the luxury liners of the road.

Motor homes or class A RVs are the luxury liners of the road. With use, even a high end RVs shows its age and fixtures become outdated. Updating and remodeling a class A RV is less expensive than spending $100,000 or more for a new rig. Target a few key areas to make the biggest impact when remodeling. The main living area, the kitchen and bedroom, should be the focus of a class A RV remodel.

Replace the current bed in the master bedroom area. There are models specifically designed for RV use. If the mattresses in the RV are more than five years old they should be replaced. After spending money on the master bedroom, replace the other mattresses. Use foam mattresses for beds that are seldom used and purchase high end mattresses for beds that are used frequently.

Replace the dome lights with new, updated models. RV camping stores have beautiful lighting options. Remove the old fixture, install the new one and run a bead of clear silicone sealant around the base to keep out water.

Check all interior and exterior coach and carriage lights. Check all tail lights, backup lights, blinkers and head lights. Replace all lights that are scratched, chipped or cracked. If the headlight lenses are yellowed or cloudy, replace them.

Remove old, worn out carpeting using a floor scraper. Measure the carpeted area. Calculate the amount of square footage by multiplying the length of the area by the width. Purchase enough tile to cover the area, allowing for a ten percent overage.

Install high end peel and stick tile in the area that was carpeted. Start in the center of the area and apply the tile by peeling off the paper backing and pressing the tile onto the floor. Tile wears better and lasts longer than carpeting. For RVers with pets, tile is preferred as it does not offer hiding places for ticks and fleas.

Add under counter LED lighting. Fixtures that run on batteries are available for RV use. These units do not require an electrical connection. LED lights last longer than fluorescent bulbs and they are safer for the environment because they do not contain mercury.

Add an induction burner next to the stove. Stand alone units plug into the wall and can be stored in a cabinet when not in use. An induction burner cooks faster than a sealed burner and it adds a high end appliance to the kitchen area.

Fill in nicks and dings in the cabinets with wood putty. Apply the putty to the damaged area, allow it to dry and sand it smooth.

Items you will need

  • Sleep Number® bed
  • Replacement dome lights
  • Peel and stick tile
  • Tape measure
  • Replacement light assemblies
  • Under counter LED lighting
  • Floor scraper
  • Utility knife
  • Silicon sealant
  • Induction burner
  • Wood putty
  • Sandpaper

References

  • "Woodall's RV Owners Handbook"; Woodall's Publishing Corp.; 2005 edition.

About the Author

Lynda Altman started writing professionally in 2001, specializing in genealogy, home-schooling, gardening, animals and crafts. Her work has appeared in "Family Chronicle Magazine" and "Chihuahua Magazine." Altman holds a B.A. in marketing from Mercy College, a black belt in taekwondo, master gardener certification, a certificate in graphic arts and a certificate in genealogy.

Photo Credits

  • lake mead national recreation area 8 image by Jim Parkin from Fotolia.com