How to Disassemble a Bryco

by Barry Index

Bryco Arms has been making inexpensive handguns since 1968. The company went through several name changes, beginning with Raven Arms, then Bryco Arms, Jennings Arms and finally Jimenez arms, changing ownership again due to a lawsuit and subsequent buyout. Bryco received substantial bad press over the years due to in part to alleged low-grade manufacturing. However, according to "Gun Tests" magazine, "the P-380 functions reliably; if you're on a tight budget, this pistol should meet your shooting needs." The model 380 has always been one of Bryco's top sellers and Jimenez still produces it as the JA-380.

Move the safety lever located on the left side of the handgun at the top of the grip into the "Safe" position. Pull the magazine catch so the magazine drops from the bottom of the grip and pull the slide to the rear, the top portion of the weapon, to check that there are no unused rounds in the chamber. The gun must be emptied before take-down can begin.

Push the take-down button located at the rear of the slide using a punch tool. While holding the take-down button in, lift the slide away from the frame, then release the take-down button and pull the slide off the front of the gun.

Unscrew the grip screw in the pistol grip on both sides to remove the pistol grips. Examine the bottom half of the weapon for signs of wear or debris and then set aside the bottom half of the firearm.

Remove the firing pin from the inside of the slide, followed by the firing pin spring and the take-down button. Examine the slide for any signs of wear or debris.

Clean the firearm according to the owner's manual instructions and reassemble the weapon by following these directions in reverse order. Before loading the weapon, operate the trigger, the safety lever and the take-down button to make sure they function properly.

Items you will need

  • Punch tool
  • Screwdriver

Tip

  • Set aside all gun parts in order of removal so they can be reinstalled in the proper order.

Warning

  • Clean the firearm after every shooting session to maintain the weapon. This helps keep the handgun in working order and minimizes gun failure.

About the Author

Barry Index lives in Los Angeles where he has been writing about writing since 1998. Recent freelance activities have brought his work to wider audiences through FictionAnitdote.com and several other writer-enthusiast sites. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree in English from California State University, Northridge.