How to Unlock a Browning ProSteel Safe

by Gus Stephens

Browning's line of ProSteel gun safes protect firearms, jewelry and other important personal property from theft and fire. The Platinum Plus series has a 3/16-inch steel body and 1 1/2-inch locking bolts. These safes are available in sizes to accommodate all firearms, including long guns, plus ammunition and family valuables. Key-locked combination locks feature resilient cam-locking systems and doors that are protected with anti-pry bolts at all corners. Layers of high-density fire-resistant insulation and a fire seal surrounding the door ensure fire protection rated at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit for 120 minutes. If you want to get into one of these, you'd better know the combination.

Unlock the combination dial. Turn the dial until "0" is in the 12 o'clock position. Insert the key-lock key into the center of the combination dial and turn the key counterclockwise.

Turn the combination dial in the counterclockwise direction four full rotations. Pass the first combination number three times and stop on it the fourth rotation.

Turn the combination dial clockwise three full rotations. Pass the second combination number twice and stop on it on the third rotation.

Turn the combination dial counterclockwise two full rotations. Pass the third combination number once and stop on it on the second rotation.

Turn the dial clockwise until it stops, normally at or near the number 95.

Turn the safe handle clockwise and open the door.

Items you will need

  • Combination dial key-lock key
  • Combination


  • If you miss any of the combination numbers by more than one mark, the door will not open.
  • Make sure you look straight down at the index marks on the combination dial.
  • Make sure to align the numbers with the center index line at the 12 o'clock position.
  • If the safe does not open, rotate the safe handle clockwise and dial the combination numbers again.

About the Author

Gus Stephens has written about aviation, automotive and home technology for 15 years. His articles have appeared in major print outlets such as "Popular Mechanics" and "Invention & Technology." Along the way, Gus earned a Bachelor of Arts in communications. If it flies, drives or just sits on your desk and blinks, he's probably fixed it.