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Travel Supreme Specs

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Travel Supreme began making recreational vehicles in 1989. The Indiana-based company went out of business in the recession of 2008. Travel Supreme motor homes and fifth-wheel RVs still are sought by buyers because they have a high level of customization and use quality materials. Fifth-wheel RVs are trailers that are hitched to a towing vehicle using a pin and flat iron plate, like a tractor-trailer. Jayco, a competitor also based in Indiana, acquired Travel Supreme assets and folded them into a new subsidiary, Entegra Coach.

Travel Supreme Toy Hauler Coach

Toy Haulers are one of the newer trends in RVs. They have a garage for motorcycles, ATVs, mountain bikes, golf carts and other "toys". Travel Supreme made a Class A (bus style) motor-home toy hauler. This model has a 10-foot, 2,000-pound capacity garage built into the back. The rear door opens upwards. ToyHauler Magazine in a review said the hydraulic platform is a real bonus for loading and unloading heavy equipment. The RV has a 6-speed automatic transmission, and is able to tow 5,000 pounds. Living space includes a bedroom with a king-sized bed, a faux fireplace, and granite counter tops in the kitchen.

Travel Supreme began making recreational vehicles in 1989. The Indiana-based company went out of business in the recession of 2008. Travel Supreme motor homes and fifth-wheel RVs still are sought by buyers because they have a high level of customization and use quality materials. Fifth-wheel RVs are trailers that are hitched to a towing vehicle using a pin and flat iron plate, like a tractor-trailer. Jayco, a competitor also based in Indiana, acquired Travel Supreme assets and folded them into a new subsidiary, Entegra Coach.

Travel Supreme Select Limited

The 2007 Travel Supreme Select Limited is a diesel, rear-wheel drive, class A motor home. The 45DS24 model is 44 feet, 11 inches long. Six different floor plans were available. All variations had four slide-outs, a king-sized bed and front cab privacy divider. This large RV has 60-gallon grey and black water tanks. Fresh water comes from a 100-gallon tank with an on-demand water heater. The interior decoration was inspired by ancient Greece, with columns, and crown moldings. Everything is powered by electricity from batteries as opposed to propane. Appliances include a pullout-drawer dishwasher, and 120-watt convection microwave oven.

Travel Supreme began making recreational vehicles in 1989. The Indiana-based company went out of business in the recession of 2008. Travel Supreme motor homes and fifth-wheel RVs still are sought by buyers because they have a high level of customization and use quality materials. Fifth-wheel RVs are trailers that are hitched to a towing vehicle using a pin and flat iron plate, like a tractor-trailer. Jayco, a competitor also based in Indiana, acquired Travel Supreme assets and folded them into a new subsidiary, Entegra Coach.

2008 Fifth Wheels

In its last year of operation, 2008, Travel Supreme offered 17 fifth-wheel models ranging in length from 34 feet, two inches to 40 feet, nine inches. All models have slide outs for bedroom and kitchen. As many as four additional slide-outs were available. Standard bathroom features include a garden shower, Corian counters, and skylight. The kitchen comes with a three-burner stove with oven, microwave, and double-door refrigerator. Queen-sized beds, and a built-in metal safe in the bedroom are standard. Most models offered an optional king sized bed. The trailers are equipped with 55 gallon grey and black water tanks, and a 75 gallon fresh water tank.

References

About the Author

Elizabeth McCready has been a freelance writer since 2007. She has written business, tourism and IT documents. She also compiled the literature review for an Ontario-wide health study and worked in the outdoor and adventure tourism industry. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in social anthropology, with a geography minor, from the University of Calgary and a Bachelor of Science in sciences from Lakehead University.

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