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How to Remove a Table in an RV

by Lynda Altman
RV dinette table. You can see where it attaches to the wall.

RV dinette table. You can see where it attaches to the wall.

RVs have two types of tables: dinette and stand-alone. Dinette tables are in or near the kitchen area and serve a dual purpose. By day it is a table; by night it becomes part of a bed. Some higher-end RVs have stand-alone tables. This type of table is almost identical to your kitchen or dining table at home but is secured to the floor. Removal of an RV table requires the removal of bolts and screws that secure it to the wall and floor.

Removing a Dinette Table

Unlock the table top as if you were going to convert the dinette into a bed. The locking mechanism is on the underside of the tabletop, usually near the wall. Lower the base so it is even with the dinette seats. Some table tops must be turned 90 degrees for the table to lower.

Find the bolts holding the table to the floor. Use a socket wrench to remove the bolts, which may be hidden by carpeting. If this is the case, peel back the carpeting to find the bolts.

Lift the table up and off of the base and remove it.

Removing a Free-Standing Table

Lower table leaves and lock into place. The locking mechanism is on the underside of the leaves. Check to see if the table is secured to the wall. If it is, use a cordless drill to remove the screws from the brackets. Remove the brackets from the table and the wall.

Find the bolts holding the table to the floor. The bolts may be hidden under carpet or under a panel. They are at each leg of the table or along a center pedestal. Peel back the carpet or lift the floor panel to expose the bolts.

Use a socket wrench to remove the bolts. Lift the table up and off of the base to remove it.

Items you will need

  • Cordless drill
  • Screwdriver bit
  • Socket wrench
  • WD-40 or other household lubricant

Tips

  • Removing the tabletop may make removing the base easier.
  • Use a lubricant such as WD-40 to loosen hard-to-remove bolts.

References

  • "Woodall's RV Owners Handbook"; Woodall's Publishing Corp.; 2005 edition

About the Author

Lynda Altman started writing professionally in 2001, specializing in genealogy, home-schooling, gardening, animals and crafts. Her work has appeared in "Family Chronicle Magazine" and "Chihuahua Magazine." Altman holds a B.A. in marketing from Mercy College, a black belt in taekwondo, master gardener certification, a certificate in graphic arts and a certificate in genealogy.

Photo Credits

  • Trinette Reed/Photodisc/Getty Images