How to Remove the Front Sight of a Ruger 10/22

by Cassandra Tribe
Allot time to remove the sight.

Allot time to remove the sight.

The Ruger 10/22 (Magnum, Standard or Compact) models differ greatly from the other Ruger auto-loading rifles. Typical of Ruger design, though, the process to remove the front sight of a Ruger 10/22 is relatively simple but will require some time.

Check that the rifle is completely unloaded. Remove the magazine, rack the bolt and check the chamber.

Mount the Ruger 10/22 in a padded gun vise. Grip the stock of the rifle about three-quarters of the way up the barrel between the rear and front sight.

Spray the front sight and the front sight retaining ring with penetrating lubricant. Let the rifle sit overnight to allow the lubricant to completely work its way into the sight assembly.

Remove the sight ring retention bolt using a flathead screwdriver. Turn the bolt counterclockwise until it is loose enough for you to remove it from the ring by hand.

Strike the sight on the side just above the retention collar, using a punch and a wooden mallet. Then strike it on the other side, and repeat until the sight collar loosens up and you can see that the whole assembly "rocks" when you strike it.

Use the punch and wooden mallet to drive the front sight off the barrel. Place the punch at the base of the sight (where the sight joins the collar, do not strike it at the collar) and hit it with the mallet. Use short, sharp steady blows until the entire assembly comes off the barrel.

Items you will need

  • Padded gun vise
  • Penetrating lubricant
  • Flathead screwdriver
  • Punch
  • Small wood mallet

Tip

  • Don't change your sight the day before a big hunting trip or shooting match. Plan on making the change so you will have enough time to get used to your new sight.

Warning

  • Never work on a loaded weapon. A sudden impact to the body of the weapon can cause it to discharge.

References

  • Instruction Manual for Ruger Model 10/22 Autoloading Rifles; Sturm, Ruger & Co.; 2005

About the Author

Cassandra Tribe has worked in the construction field for over 17 years and has experience in a variety of mechanical, scientific, automotive and mathematical forms. She has been writing and editing for over 10 years. Her areas of interest include culture and society, automotive, computers, business, the Internet, science and structural engineering and implementation.

Photo Credits

  • sport shooting image by Kostyantyn Ivanyshen from Fotolia.com