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How to Make a Paracord Wrap for a Walking Stick

by Zach Lazzari
Paracord creates a comfortable grip on walking sticks.

Paracord creates a comfortable grip on walking sticks.

Wrapped paracord creates a durable handle for walking sticks and knife handles. The paracord also doubles as a survival aid and is easily stripped off the stick in an emergency situation. Wrapping the paracord is not overly complex but the wraps must be tight and well planned to create a secure handle. Several different techniques are available for wrapping the paracord with different aesthetic value resulting from each. The simple layover style wrapping job with a secure knot on the bottom prevents slipping and builds an even grip.

1.

Measure the width of your palm and multiply by 1.5. Mark the top and bottom of the grip location with a pencil according to the calculation.

2.

Place one end of the paracord against the bottom measurement. Hold the end against the measurement and measure the cord to the top measurement. Hold the top measurement flush against the stick and wrap the cord and stick with electrical tape to hold the position.

3.

Wrap the paracord over the tape, from the top measurement to the bottom measurement. Make successive, tight wraps to form the handle.

4.

Tie 10 successive half hitch knots to secure the wraps and prevent slipping. The half hitch is a single overhand knot around the handle. The single half hitch is not sufficient for anchoring the rope but multiple half hitch knots create a tight weave.

5.

Coat the final half hitch knot with instant glue to secure the materials and prevent unraveling. Cut the paracord flush against the final knot after the glue dries.

Items you will need

  • Paracord
  • Tape measure
  • Pencil
  • Scissors
  • Electrical tape
  • Instant glue

Tip

  • Add a Turk's Head knot to the top and bottom of the wraps for an extravagant design. The knot is complex and requires at least one hour to complete in perfect fashion.

About the Author

Zach Lazzari is a freelance outdoor writer specializing in hunting, fly fishing and the general outdoors. He guided fly fishing trips for 10 years in Colorado, Alaska, Montana and Patagonia-Chile. Zach lives in Montana and splits time between the river and keyboard.

Photo Credits

  • Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images