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How to Make a Cowboy Hat Helmet

by Christopher Michael
Look stylish and stay safe by fitting a cowboy hat over your riding helmet.

Look stylish and stay safe by fitting a cowboy hat over your riding helmet.

According to National Electronic Injury Surveillance System data from 2007, 78,279 people visited the emergency room for horseback riding-related injuries. Approximately 15 percent of those injured, or 11,759 people, sought treatment for head injuries. Horseback riding is as dangerous as motorcycle driving, and most states enforce a helmet law for motorcyclists. But you can protect yourself and look good on your horse by making a cowboy hat helmet.

1.

Take your riding helmet into a store that sells cowboy hats. Put the helmet on and try out your favorite hats by fitting them over your helmet. Purchase a good looking hat that fits snugly.

2.

If your cowboy hat has straps, cut them off with scissors.

3.

Buy color-coordinated, adhesive-backed, fabric hook-and-loop fastener tape. If your cowboy hat is light in color, buy white tape. If it's dark, purchase black tape.

4.

Tape around the lower edge of the inside rim of the hat using the hook side of the tape. Tape the sides, front and back of the bowl. Use scissors to cut the strips.

5.

Apply the loop side of the fastener tape to the crown of your helmet. Place pieces similar in length to the pieces of the hook-side tape on the inside of your hat. Place the tape strategically to affix your cowboy hat where you'd like it to sit on your head.

6.

Fit the hat onto your helmet, pressing firmly down on the fastener tape.

Items you will need

  • Riding helmet
  • Cowboy hat
  • Scissors
  • Adhesive-backed hook-and-loop fastener tape

Tip

  • Using hook-and-loop fastener tape allows you to change hats while using the same helmet.

About the Author

Christopher Michael began writing in 2010 for Break.com. He received a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Writing sports and travel articles helps support his professional baseball career, which has taken him to 49 states, five continents and four oceans.

Photo Credits

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