How to Loosen Longboard Trucks

by Nick Mann
The looser longboard trucks are, the wider the turns can be.

The looser longboard trucks are, the wider the turns can be.

Riding a longboard is just like riding a regular skateboard, except the board is significantly longer. In addition, the motions of longboarding are smooth like surfing and a minimal amount of tricks are performed. In order to control the degree of turns, the trucks of a longboard can be either loosened or tightened. Looser trucks mean wider turns, while tighter trucks mean less of a turn. Following five steps should make it possible for most people to effectively loosen their longboard trucks.

1.

Lay your longboard upside down on top of a table in order to adjust the trucks. Doing so will provide a stable surface for making adjustments.

2.

Place either a socket wrench or adjustable wrench around the nut of the first truck. In most cases, a 14-mm wrench is ideal for longboard trucks.

3.

Turn the wrench counter-clockwise to loosen the first truck. Keep turning it until you have achieved the desired level of looseness. If you are experiencing stability issues during this process, you can secure the truck by placing a Phillips head screwdriver around one of the screws on the opposite side of your longboard and holding it in place.

4.

Repeat the same process on the opposite truck until it is approximately the same level of looseness.

5.

Place your longboard on the ground and stand on top of it. Decide if the trucks are loose enough. If not, follow the same steps until they are loose enough. If they have become too loose, follow the same steps, but turn each nut clockwise in order to tighten them slightly.

Items you will need

  • Socket wrench or adjustable wrench
  • Phillips head screwdriver (optional)

Warning

  • Make sure that your trucks are secure before riding your longboard. Otherwise, it could cause you to crash.

About the Author

Nick Mann has been a writer since 2005, focusing on home-and-garden topics. He has a bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of North Carolina at Asheville.

Photo Credits

  • Ryan McVay/Digital Vision/Getty Images