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How to Disassemble an SKS Trigger

by David Somerset

Disassembling an SKS trigger requires only common household tools.

trigger image by Rick Sargeant from Fotolia.com

The SKS is a popular rifle among firearms collectors and shooters. The Soviet-designed rifle was created in Russia following World War II. Many surplus models are available today, but because all of the available SKS rifles are military surplus, they might take some maintenance and repair to make them work well. When working on a surplus SKS, you might need to disassemble the trigger to clean it and make sure that all of the moving parts are in working order.

Unload the SKS and make sure the safety is on. Never work with firearms until you have performed this important safety measure.

Remove the trigger assembly from the SKS. Press the button located directly behind the trigger guard, and the assembly will pull from the rifle stock.

De-cock the rifle hammer. Turn the safety off, then pull the trigger. Use your thumb to control the falling of the hammer when it is released.

Remove the latch-stop pin by depressing the magazine latch. Pull the magazine latch, sear and sear spring off of the trigger assembly. These parts are the ones located just under the de-cocked hammer.

Dislodge the hammer and strut. You will first need to compress the spring that holds the hammer. The hammer and strut come out as a complete unit.

Use a 3/32-inch punch and a hammer to knock out the disconnector pin. Remove the disconnector and disconnector pin from the trigger assembly.

Punch out the trigger bar pin with a 3/32-inch punch. Remove the trigger, trigger bar and safety spring.

Remove the safety pin with the 3/32 inch punch. Pull the safety from the trigger assembly to complete disassembly.

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About the Author

David Somerset has been a writer intermittently for 11 years. He attended New Mexico Tech and earned a Bachelor of Science in technical communication in 2007. From being published in the "Bucksworth Community News" to writing how-to articles for eHow, his experience is quite diverse.