×

Homemade Catfish Blood Bait

by Lee Morgan
Chum the water with dry dog food to draw in catfish.

Chum the water with dry dog food to draw in catfish.

Blood bait is gelatinous bait made from coagulated beef blood used to catch catfish. Blood bait can be purchased from fishing shops or online retailers, but if you can get your hands on beef blood then you can easily make your own homemade blood bait using a variety of methods.

Slaughterhouse Bait

An effective and stable blood bait can be made from the lungs of a cow from a slaughterhouse, according to the Texas Catfishin’ Resource website.

Ask a localslaughterhouse if you can obtain a set of beef lungs with the windpipe still connected. Hang the lungs up in a cooler and pour the blood down the windpipe until the lungs are filled.

Remove the lungs from the cooler 24 hours later. They will have absorbed the blood into the tissue where it becomes coagulated from the cold temperatures. Slice the lungs into cubes to use for bait. The chunks of bait will stay on the hook and will bleed out when the blood becomes liquid again in the water.

Tray of Blood Bait

Use a shallow sheet pan and a large refrigerator to make a simple blood bait, advises to Catfish1.com.

Pour beef blood into the pan, almost to the rim, and carefully place the pan in a refrigerator overnight. The cold from the refrigerator will coagulate the blood and turn it into a jelly-like consistency.

Remove the blood from the refrigerator the next day and use a utility knife to slice it into cubes. Store the cubes in an airtight container in the refrigerator until ready for use. Place your hook into a cube of the blood and cast into the lake to attract catfish.

Frozen Blood Bait

Use frozen blood bait for cat fishing on a hot summer day for a bait that will last longer in the warm temperatures.

Fill a standard ice tray with beef blood and place a hook in each compartment and leave it overnight. The blood will coagulate then freeze around the hook. Place the entire tray of baits into a cooler to take on your fishing trip.

Tie your fishing line to the hook when the bait begins to thaw, and cast it into the water where they will begin to bleed out quickly. Once the cubes begin thawing you should be able to set a hook when the fish bites.

About the Author

Lee Morgan is a fiction writer and journalist. His writing has appeared for more than 15 years in many news publications including the "Tennesseean," the "Tampa Tribune," "West Hawaii Today," the "Honolulu Star Bulletin" and the "Dickson Herald," where he was sports editor. He holds a Bachelor of Science in mass communications from Middle Tennessee State University.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images