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How to Clean a Coleman Sleeping Bag

by Samantha Volz

In many outdoors and sporting circles, Coleman is a name synonymous with camping gear and supplies. The company began making products in the early 1900s, and now manufactures tents, lanterns, beds, sleeping bags and other supplies. Regular use of the sleeping bag means you'll need to wash it to remove dirt, sweat and other contaminants and protect the bag from stains and odors.

Machine Wash

Put the Coleman sleeping bag in a front-loading rotating washer. Make sure the bag is unzipped so that both the interior and exterior are washed. Do not use top-loading or agitating washing machines, because these can damage or tear the sleeping bag.

Add ¼ cup of mild laundry detergent and ¼ cup of fabric softener. Make sure the detergent does not contain bleach, as bleach will discolor the bag.

Run the washer on a warm water wash cycle and a cold water rinse cycle. Wash the sleeping bag alone, with no other garments.

Dry the sleeping bag in a tumble dryer at a low-heat temperature. Alternatively, allow the bag to air dry in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight and intense heat. Allow the bag to dry completely before using or storing it.

Hand Wash

Fill a bathtub with warm water. Mix in ¼ cup of mild laundry detergent and ¼ cup of fabric softener. Make sure the detergent does not contain bleach, as bleach will discolor the bag.

Soak the Coleman sleeping bag in the soap and water mixture. Move the bag back and forth through the water to make sure all surfaces are cleaned.

Drain the tub and rinse the bag thoroughly in clean, cold water to remove residual soap. Rinse until the water runs completely clear.

Dry the sleeping bag in a tumble dryer at a low-heat temperature. Alternatively, allow the bag to air dry in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight and intense heat. Allow the bag to dry completely before using or storing it.

Items you will need

  • Front-loading washer
  • Laundry detergent
  • Fabric softener
  • Dryer
  • Bathtub

Warning

  • Coleman recommends that you do not dry-clean your sleeping bag, because some chemicals may cause damage or discoloration.

About the Author

Samantha Volz has been involved in journalistic and informative writing for over eight years. She holds a bachelor's degree in English literature from Lycoming College, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, with a minor in European history. In college she was editor-in-chief of the student newspaper and completed a professional internship with the "Williamsport Sun-Gazette," serving as a full-time reporter. She resides in Horsham, Pennsylvania.