How to Clean a Caravan Awning

by Patrick Cameron

A good awning can make all the difference between a few days in camping heaven and a couple days of misery. Whether weather conditions are cold and wet or hot and sun-beaten, the awning for your caravan can give you some extra space to hide out that's still outside, without having to spend all your time in a cramped camper.

Set up your awning. Never clean any awning when it isn't upright. Cleaning a down awning will not allow the canvas to dry properly and could cause the onset of mold or fungus. Pick a warm, dry day and make sure your caravan awning is dry as well before you start cleaning.

Use a soft cloth and water. Surprisingly, the best way to keep your caravan awning clean is simple. Because caravan awnings are made of canvas, they have weatherproofing protection on them. Water and a soft cloth are about the only things that won't break down this built-in protection.

Get the dirt and grime before it sets in. If you can wipe off the dirt, bird droppings or whatever it is that's making your awning look dirty before the stuff has a chance to really set in, this is ideal. Even water can have an adverse effect on the weather-proofing of your caravan awning over time, so try to get the stuff right away.

Use one of the many awning cleaners available from outdoors stores and RV dealers. These will help you get a little extra cleaning power on your caravan awning without doing harm to the canvas or diminishing the effectiveness of the waterproofing.

Use a cap of bleach in warm water and a soft cloth when in doubt. This will really make a difference in how clean you can get a really grimy awning. The only downfall is that you'll want to reapply waterproofing before you use the awning in wet conditions.

Items you will need

  • Hose Soft cloth Awning cleaner

About the Author

Patrick Cameron is a freelance writer with 10 years of diverse experience in consumer goods branding, promotions and retail communications. He works out of his home in Denver, Colo. He received his Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from the University of Minnesota.