How to Build a Volleyball Net

by Ran Brown
Build your own high-quality and portable volleyball net

Build your own high-quality and portable volleyball net

Volleyball is a fun pastime whether you are playing in the park, or competing in a local tournament. However, it can be difficult to find a suitable playing surface if you don't have a quality volleyball net. The good news is that you can easily build a fully portable high-quality net in just a few days.

Take the two galvanized fence posts and measure from the bottom to a height of 8 feet and mark the measurement for drilling using the chalk. From the 8 foot mark, measure down 40 inches and mark that measurement for drilling.

Drill two holes in each pole at the previously marked measurements.

Screw one nut all the way to the top of each of the eyelet bolts and slide the washer up to the nut. With the nuts in place, feed one eyelet bolt through each hole, add the washer and secure the eyelet bolts into place with the second nut. You have now built the poles that will hold your volleyball net.

Mix the concrete to the consistency recommended on the concrete bag instructions.

Spread your plastic sheet on a flat, level surface and lay the two tires on top of the plastic sheet. Pour the concrete into the tires filling the tires nearly to the top.

Measure the center of the concrete with your measuring tape and mark with your pencil. With the center point measured, take the poles and force them into the concrete at the center point (eyelet bolts on top). Once the poles are in place use the level to be sure the poles are straight and set in the concrete.

Wait for the concrete to dry for two to three days and fasten the volleyball net to the eyelets on the poles. You now have a portable net system that is strong enough to handle even the most aggressive of volleyball matches.

Items you will need

  • 2 9-foot galvanized chain link fence poles
  • Two used tires
  • Volleyball net
  • Concrete
  • Concrete mixing tub
  • 4 eyelet bolts with eight nuts and washers
  • Drill with bit (Slightly larger diameter than eyelet bolts)
  • Measuring tape
  • Plastic sheet
  • Pencil
  • Chalk
  • Level


  • Remember that your net/pole system can easily be moved by leaning the poles over so that the tires act as wheels.

About the Author

Ran Brown has been writing for over 15 years. His work has been published in the "Nashville Tennessean" as well as several industry-specific entertainment and wireless industry publications. Ran holds a bachelor's degree in finance with an English minor, and a Master of Business Administration.

Photo Credits

  • volleyball net with palm trees in the backgound image by jeff gynane from