How to Build Shooting Houses for Deer Hunting

by Michael Kozlowski
A buck catching movement can be avoided through concealment in a shooting house.

A buck catching movement can be avoided through concealment in a shooting house.

There are many elaborate plans available for building deer hunting shooting houses---also known as blinds or shacks. You can also purchase portable deer blinds. However, a simple, easy-to-build shooting house will serve the purpose of concealing your movements, muffling your sound and limiting your scent. This shooting house is also easy to take apart should you want to move it.

Cut two 2-by-4s to lengths of 4 feet and two more to lengths of 45 inches. Screw the pieces together with 3-inch wood screws to form a box. By putting the 45-inch pieces inside of the 4-foot pieces you will create a 4-by-4 frame. Repeat these steps to create a second frame.

Cut four more 2-by-4s to 5-foot lengths. Use these pieces as the corner uprights of your shooting house. Screw them to one of your box frames (serving as the bottom frame of the shooting house) so that one edge is flush to each corner. Repeat this assembly to mount the other box as the top frame of the shooting house. You will now have a rectangular frame that looks a bit like a short, roomy phone booth.

Cut five pieces of 1/2-inch plywood, 4-feet wide and 5-feet long. Screw four of these pieces to the uprights on each side of the shooting house to serve as the walls. Screw the fifth piece to the top to shield you from the weather.

Use a jig saw to cut an opening in one side of the blind for entry. Sit inside the blind, as you would when hunting, to determine the placement of window cutouts. Mark them and use the jig saw to cut out the openings.

Complete the shooting house by using various shades of spray paint to paint the exterior walls in a camouflage pattern. The screws allow for easy assembly and dis-assembly should you need to move the blind or take it down out of season.

Items you will need

  • 8-foot-long 2-by-4s, 8
  • 4-by-8-foot sheets of 1/2-inch plywood, 5
  • Spray paint
  • 3-inch wood screws, 50
  • Table saw
  • Jig saw

Warning

  • Always follow the manufacturer's safety instructions when working with power tools.

About the Author

Michael Kozlowski began writing in 2006 and has published fiction in Eternal Press, "The Monsters Next Door" and "Scarlett Literary Magazine." He also has a novel-length travel memoir distributed through ecapeartist.com. He spent many years in the manufacturing and construction trades, traveling extensively. Kozlowski attended Wayne State University for graphic design and fine art.

Photo Credits