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How to Twirl a Kappa Cane

by Breann Kanobi
Spin your cane using popular jazz techniques.

Spin your cane using popular jazz techniques.

The Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity popularized the art of twisting and twirling canes. Instead of performing traditional "taps," fraternity members created unique cane spinning routines. If you wish to perform the most traditional Kappa cane twirl, learn the basic cane twirls and combine them into a routine. Teach your friends the routine and perform it on stage or during marches to emulate the performances of the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity.

Perform a basic thumb twirl. Place the cane in your hand so that your four fingers rest on top of the cane and your thumb rests on the bottom of the cane. Push your thumb upwards as you twist your wrist clockwise. As the cane turns, open your hand so that it is flat and your thumb is extended. Catch the cane with your thumb after it completes a 180-degree spin.

Turn the thumb twirl into a five-finger twirl. After you catch the cane with your thumb, push it clockwise. Catch the cane with your first finger. Spin the cane downwards, twisting it over your first finger and onto your middle finger. Continue twisting the cane downwards until it reaches your little finger.

Extend the five-finger twirl into a five-finger roll. When the cane reaches your pinkie, twirl it backwards. Open your hand and extend your fingers as you catch the cane with your thumb.

Perform a roll over. Grasp the cane with your fingers on top and your thumb on the bottom. Twist your wrist clockwise as you flatten your palm. Catch the cane between your fingers and thumb. Push the cane counter-clockwise. Catch it by grasping it as in your original position. Push the cane clockwise. Roll your hand clockwise to roll the cane over your hand. Catch the cane in your hand when it completes the roll.

About the Author

Breann Kanobi has worked as freelance writer since 2010. Kanobi regularly submits content online to Gamer DNA. Kanobi received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in film and television from New York University in 2010.

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