How to String a Shimano Reel

by James Clark
Spool new line on a Shimano reel to reduce lost fish due to old line breaks.

Spool new line on a Shimano reel to reduce lost fish due to old line breaks.

Shimano manufactures a line of spinning reels for freshwater and saltwater fishing. The open-face spinning reel retrieves line with a metal bail that rotates around the fixed spool. When casting, the bail raises to the upright, open position. Seasoned anglers change the line on their fishing reels before the start of each season to reduce the risk of lost fish due to a line break. Respooling a Shimano with fresh line should take less than 15 minutes.

Raise the bail on the Shimano reel to the upright position by lifting it 45 degrees until the bail locks open.

Peel off the old line down to the spool, using a pocketknife to clip the line at the knot.

Thread the end of the new line through the rod tip and down through each guide to the Shimano reel. Make sure the bail is still locked in the open position.

Wrap the line around the spool several times to give the line some traction, then tie it to the spool with a double overhand knot.

Close the bail to the locked position by pushing it downward, or simply turn the reel handle clockwise to close the bail automatically.

Add line to the spool by cranking the reel handle clockwise about one full rotation per second to wind the line evenly without snarling. Fill with line to the inner mark on the underside of the spool.

Cut the line at the rod tip and tie a snap swivel to the end, then clip the swivel to the rod tip to hold the line securely until it's time to go fishing.

Items you will need

  • Shimano reel mounted on a rod.
  • New fishing line
  • Pocketknife
  • Snap swivel

Warning

  • Dispose properly of old fishing line. Don't leave it in the field where wildlife could choke or become entangled on the loops of line.

About the Author

James Clark began his career in 1985. He has written about electronics, appliance repair and outdoor topics for a variety of publications and websites. He has more than four years of experience in appliance and electrical repairs. Clark holds a bachelor's degree in political science.

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