How to Replace Bow Rider Seats on a Boat

by Jeremy Hoefs
Boat seats are susceptible to damage, scratches or fading necessitating replacement.

Boat seats are susceptible to damage, scratches or fading necessitating replacement.

Boats will commonly feature one or more seats based on the craft's size. With exposure to sun, wind, heat and water, the seats may require occasional replacement. While a simple repair involving changing the seat may be required, replacing the vinyl on the seat requires concentration and preparation to ensure the vinyl is fitted properly to the seat. Hiring a professional boat center to replace your boat seat can be expensive, but performing the repairs yourself can save time and money.

Remove the seat from the base attached to the bow of the boat. The seat will typically be attached with screws or bolts. Use the appropriate screwdriver or wrench to loosen the base.

Lift the old seat from the mount and base and set it on a flat surface.

Use a flat screwdriver to remove the staples attaching the vinyl covering to the seat. Most vinyl coverings come in two pieces -- one for the back rest and one for the flat section of the seat.

Attach the new vinyl covering on the seat with a staple gun. Pull the vinyl tight and make sure the front of the seat is free from wrinkles or creases before fastening the vinyl to the seat.

Insert new bolts or screws into the mounting base in the bow of the boat.

Install the new seat in the pedestal mount and use a level to ensure the seat is mounted properly. Additional washers can be used under the mounting bolts to adjust the seat until it is level.

Items you will need

  • Screwdriver or wrench
  • Level
  • Seat vinyl
  • Staple gun
  • Washers


  • Contact a local boat service shop for detailed questions about replacing a bow rider seat.

About the Author

Based in Nebraska, Jeremy Hoefs began writing fitness, nutrition, outdoor and hunting articles in 2006. His articles have been published in "Star City Sports," "Hunting Fitness Magazine" and RutWear field journals, as well as on the Western Whitetail website. Hoefs graduated with a Bachelor of Science in exercise science from Nebraska Wesleyan University.

Photo Credits