How to Rebuild a Force Outboard Carburetor

by Andrea Walk

Force outboard boat motors were initially manufactured in the late 1980s when U.S. Marine bought out the Chrysler outboard manufacturing plant in Wisconsin. Force outboards were also the stock engine for a while in Bayliner boats. Changing out the lower gear oil and replacing the water pump is part of routine outboard maintenance. However, you may also have to rebuild the carburetor at some point. Buy carburetor rebuild kits at marine dealerships.

1. Unlatch and open the Force outboard's engine cover. Set the cover aside.

2. Remove all hoses attached to the carburetor using a screwdriver, and pull the throttle linkage from the control arm of the Force carburetor with a pair of pliers.

3. Remove the bolts holding the carburetor in place using an open-end wrench. Lift the carburetor from the engine, and place it on a workbench.

4. Hold the Force carburetor over a bucket while removing the low-speed needle with a screwdriver. Remove the float bowl screw, and allow the float bowl to drain out.

5. Scrape off the old float bowl gasket with a putty knife, and replace it with a new one from a carburetor rebuild kit.

6. Remove the jet screws, the float and the valve. Clean all these parts individually. Replace any parts that or corroded or filthy with parts from the carburetor kit. Spray all the ports and jets of the carburetor with spray carburetor cleaner, and allow at least an hour for it all to dry.

7. Screw the carburetor jets all back in, and reassemble the float, valve, float bowl and low-speed needle.

8. Set the carburetor back inside the Force engine compartment, and slide the retaining bolts through the carburetor. Tighten them with your open-end wrench.

9. Attach the hoses and the carburetor linkage, then replace the engine cover.

Items you will need

  • Screwdriver
  • Pliers
  • Wrench set
  • Bucket
  • Putty knife
  • Carburetor rebuild kit
  • Spray carburetor cleaner


About the Author

Andrea Walk began writing in 2001, authoring user guides for technical software. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Loyola University, where she was a member of the Dean's Grade Review Committee for English. Walk is a member of the Automotive X-Prize team Global-E.