How to Mount Oar Locks

by Caprice Castano
Oar locks hold the oars in place so you can go when you need to.

Oar locks hold the oars in place so you can go when you need to.

Oars are a surefire power source for a boat either without a motor or when a motor decides to stop working and you are out on the water. Oar locks are what hold the oars in place to keep them on the boat, not under the water. Many boats are oar powered. Row boats are not the speediest type of craft, but with properly installed oars mounted in reliable oar locks, you will get where you are going.

1.

Place the oars in the location that they will be mounted when in use. The seat you row from should be about a foot in front of the oar locks, to allow for the oars to extend forward and a comfortable rowing position. Mark the spot where the oar locks are being mounted with a pen or pencil.

2.

Drill pilot holes for the oar lock pins. The pins are the stem at the bottom of the oar lock piece itself. There are a variety of installation methods, some oar locks have nylon bushings and can be installed directly into the boat in the pilot hole. Others have sockets that are screwed in place over the hole and the oar locks rest in these. Regardless of the mount, the pilot holes must be drilled for the pins.

3.

Attach any hardware necessary for your type of oar lock. If you are mounting them directly to the boat with no socket, consult the instructions to be sure the pins fit securely. Slide the oar lock pins into the pilot hole, and make any adjustments necessary. If you are using a socket, set the socket in place over the pin hole, and mark the outer screw holes on the bracket. You can simply screw in place or you can predrill the screw holes. Mount the oar lock socket, slip the oar lock into place by sliding the pin into the central hole, and you are ready to place your oars.

Items you will need

  • Oar locks
  • Oar lock socket
  • Drill
  • Mounting hardware
  • Screwdriver

About the Author

Caprice Castano recently left the field of construction management to operate her own contracting business and spend time developing her writing career. Current projects include freelance writing for Internet publications and working on novel-length fiction.

Photo Credits

  • Row Boat image by Heather Kitchen Images from Fotolia.com