×

How to Clean a Daiwa Reel

by Larry Anderson
Cleaning your Daiwa reel regularly will help extend its life.

Cleaning your Daiwa reel regularly will help extend its life.

There is no good time for fishing reels to stop working, but the worst is during a day of fishing. One of the easiest ways to prolong the life of all fishing reels, including those made by the Daiwa fishing equipment company, is to keep them clean. That means taking the reels apart and cleaning them at least on an annual basis, and even more frequently if you fish in saltwater or fish on a regular basis.

Remove the handle of your Daiwa reel by loosening the knob on the side of the reel opposite the handle. Turning the reel handle in a counterclockwise direction also will work. Pull the handle off the body of the reel once it is unscrewed.

Grab the screwdriver and remove the screws, which will allow you to lift off the reel plate and expose the inside of the Daiwa reel.

Grab a Q-tip and use it to clean all of the surfaces of the Daiwa that you can reach. If there are places you cannot reach but you can see they are dirty, blow on them with your mouth. A hard blow should dislodge the dirt.

Lubricate every moving part of the reel with the reel grease or WD-40.

Place the screws back in the reel and tighten them. Replace the handle and the knob on the opposite side of the reel, and turn the handle clockwise to tighten it. Spin the handle a few times to work the reel grease or WD-40 into the gears.

Wipe the outside of the Daiwa with a paper towel. If there are any tight areas that you can see are dirty, try to get at them with a Q-tip. If the Q-tip alone does not dislodge the dirt or particles, wet it with water and try again.

Items you will need

  • WD-40
  • Reel grease
  • Q-tips
  • Paper towel
  • Phillips screwdriver

About the Author

Larry Anderson has been a freelance writer since 2000. He has covered a wide variety of topics, from golf and baseball to hunting and fishing. His work has appeared in numerous print and online publications, including "Fargo Forum" newspaper. Anderson holds a Bachelor of Arts in print journalism from Concordia College.

Photo Credits