How to Troubleshoot a Cruisair

by Patrick Nelson
Change the extension cord if you are using shore power and the Cruisair still won't start.

Change the extension cord if you are using shore power and the Cruisair still won't start.

Cruisair was an early developer of climate systems for boats. The first Cruisair air conditioners were used in pleasure boats in the 1960's. Cruisair is now owned by Dometic Group, a major supplier of equipment for the recreational vehicle and 12-volt market. Problems with Cruisair boat air conditioning systems can include the air conditioner not operating, not cooling or warming in the heating mode, water dripping and the compressor cycling. You can correct certain issues by following some troubleshooting steps.

Open the circuit breaker or fuse panel if the Cruisair won't turn on, and inspect the breakers. Flip on any tripped circuit breakers and replace blown fuses with the same type and rating. Change the extension cord if you are using shore power and the Cruisair still won't start. Voltage from the shore system to the boat may be low. Replace the extension cord with a more heavy duty one.

Turn the selector switch to "Cooling" if the air from the unit doesn't feel cold. The selector switch may be set to "Fan." Look at the thermostat and set it for a cooler setting. Turn the thermostat to "Fan" if the evaporator is icing up. Leave the thermostat on "Fan" for five minutes, and then start the cooling again.

Clean the air filter behind the return air grill or on the face of the unit if the compressor keeps cycling on and off. The filter could be dirty or may have a water flow restriction. The Cruisair uses seawater to cool, so flush any debris from the filter. Pull any debris out of drain holes if water drips inside the cabin. Most Cruisair systems have two drains, one at each end of the unit.

Items you will need

  • Extension cord

About the Author

Patrick Nelson has been a professional writer since 1992. He was editor and publisher of the music industry trade publication "Producer Report" and has written for a number of technology blogs. Nelson studied design at Hornsey Art School.

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