How to Tie Two Hooks

by Rona Aquino
Tie more than one fishing hook to your line to increase your catch rate.

Tie more than one fishing hook to your line to increase your catch rate.

Attract more fish with a two-hook fishing rig. With two hooks, you can entice your favorite gamefish by attaching more baits and lures onto the line. You can also use two hooks to secure one long, live bait by attaching its tail with the first hook and its head with the second hook. By learning the two-hook technique, you can also experiment with your presentation by adding more hooks to the line.

Add several inches to the usual length of your leader, depending on the size of the lures or baits you plan to use. Pass the line through the eye of hook and allow it to extend one inch past the hook end.

Hold the hook at its shank with the point in a downward position. With your other hand, wrap the line five times around the hook just behind the hook eye while maintaining tension.

Take the long end of the line and insert it through hook eye in the opposite direction. Let the line stick out of the hook eye about two inches along the back of the hook.

Wrap the tag end of the line six times around the hook while maintaining tension.

Keep the tension on the line, then slowly pull on the two-inch piece sticking out of the hook eye. Keep pulling until the line is near the bend and the knot is secure and tight. The first hook is now tied.

Slide the second hook on a leader about one inch from the first hook. Repeat Steps 2 to 4 to tie the second hook. Depending on the size of your lure, you can move the second hook closer to or farther from the first hook.

Tighten the leader by pulling on both ends of the line. Trim off any excess ends.

Items you will need

  • Fishing line
  • Two hooks
  • Scissors

About the Author

Rona Aquino began writing professionally in 2008. As an avid marathon runner and outdoor enthusiast, she writes on topics of running, fitness and outdoor recreation for various publications. Aquino holds a Bachelor of Arts in communications and English from the University of Maryland College Park.

Photo Credits

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