Gone Outdoors

How to Tie Navy Knots

by Jaime Swanson

Navy knots are an important aspect of training, especially for Navy SEALS. If you're interested in becoming a SEAL, the Navy suggests you learn the five specific knots sailors must master before they can be considered a SEAL. By the time you have to take the skills test for the Navy, you should be able to tie these knots under water, so practice as much as you can. It's the most important thing you can do to learn to tie Navy knots.

Square Knot

Cross two pieces of rope to form an X.

Tie a half knot, also known as a half-hitch.

Cross the ropes a second time and tie another half-hitch.

Pull the ends to form a square knot.

Bowline Knot

Position a rope in front of you, with one end closest to you.

Create a loop close to the end, leaving enough rope for the loop and knot.

Pass the end of the rope through the loop, creating a half-hitch.

Pull the rope back through the loop, around the standing edge. Grasp the standing edge and pass the rope through the loop, and pull it tight. This will create your knot.

Clove Hitch Knot and Right Angle Knot

Lay out your rope, with a loop midway from the end.

Create a second loop identical to the first, but from the other end.

Lay the loops on top of each other, so they form a knot, creating what looks like a pretzel.

Pull the ends tight. For a right angle knot, you will pass the working end of your rope around what you're trying to hitch to twice.

Becket Bend Knot

Place two ropes of different diameter in front of you.

Create a loop with the thicker rope and hold it in your hand. Pass the thinner rope through and around the loop of the bigger rope.

Loop around the long, then short, ends of the rope. Tuck the smaller rope under itself to create your knot.

Items you will need
  • Rope

Tip

  • Practice makes perfect--don't get discouraged.

Warning

  • Don't try to tie these knots under water if you are an inexperienced swimmer, or before you've mastered tying them on solid ground.

About the Author

Jaime Swanson started working as a journalist in 2001. She has written and edited for newspapers in northern Illinois, including the "Daily Southtown" and the "Daily Herald," both in suburban Chicago. Swanson holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Northern Illinois University.