Gone Outdoors

How to Thread the Bobber

by Larry Anderson

Spring bobbers and slip bobbers are two of the most common types of bobbers used by anglers. Depending on the size of the bobbers, they can be used to target fish ranging in size from sunfish to muskies. Anglers of all skill levels can use bobbers, though often for different purposes. Novice anglers use bobbers to help them determine when a fish is biting, while experienced anglers use bobbers to help them present their bait at a specific spot in the water column.

Slip Bobber

Thread a bobber stop onto the end of the fishing line, followed by a bead. Bobber stops are brightly colored pieces of thread that, when tightened, stop the bobber from moving any farther up the line.

Tighten the bobber stop on the line. If you want the bait to hang at 10 feet, for example, the bobber stop should be 10 feet from the end of the line.

Thread a slip bobber onto the line. In the case of most slip bobbers, the line goes into the top of the bobber and comes out the bottom.

Crimp a split shot weight on the fishing line 8 to 10 inches above the end of the line.

Tie a hook or jig to the end of the fishing line using a Palomar knot. Bait the hook or jig with a plastic grub, or a piece of live bait like a leech, minnow or worm.

Spring Bobber

Press the button on top of the bobber with your thumb. Find the metal clasp that emerges from the bottom of the bobber.

Set the bobber on the line at the proper spot. If you want the bait to hang at 5 feet, for example, set the bottom of the bobber 5 feet from the end of the line. Place the fishing line inside the clasp on the bottom of the bobber and then release your thumb from the top of the bobber.

Place your thumb on the bottom of the bobber, over the spot from where the clasp emerged. Use your index and middle finger on the same hand to press down the outside of the button on top of the bobber, which will reveal a second metal clasp.

Insert the fishing line into the clasp and then release your fingers from the bobber.

Tie a hook or jig to the end of the fishing line using a Palomar knot. Bait the hook or jig with a plastic grub, or a piece of live bait like a leech, minnow or worm.

Items you will need
  • Fishing line
  • Bobber stop
  • Bead
  • Split shot weight

About the Author

Larry Anderson has been a freelance writer since 2000. He has covered a wide variety of topics, from golf and baseball to hunting and fishing. His work has appeared in numerous print and online publications, including "Fargo Forum" newspaper. Anderson holds a Bachelor of Arts in print journalism from Concordia College.

Photo Credits

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