Gone Outdoors

How Stick Steering Works on Outboard Motors

by Jim Hagerty

What Is Stick Steering?

Stick steering allows an outboard-powered boat to be steered from the front of the craft, without installing an independent steering system. When the stick is moved, the cable rotates a drum that's connected to the steering unit on the outboard. Stick steering units are easily installed and are fairly inexpensive ($200 to $500).

Placement

Stick steering units are placed where the driver can comfortably sit and face forward when the boat is in motion. Steering is mounted on the side of the boat or seat pedestal. It is placed so the cables are routed toward stern of the boat. Enough slack is left to reach the engine. Most stick steering units come with different cable lengths to accommodate a variety of boat sizes.

Installation

When the stick is secured in a comfortable position, the cables run along the side of the boat. They are then connected to the engine throttle and steering arm. When the stick is moved, it allows the drum, encased in the cable, to rotate, which, in turn, maneuvers the engine in the direction of the desired turns.

About the Author

Jim Hagerty is a writer and journalist who began writing professionally in 1996. He has had articles published in the "Rock River Times," "Builder's Journal" and various websites. He earned a Bachelor of Science in public relations and journalism from Northern Michigan University in Marquette.

Photo Credits

  • Rkcompanysales.com