How to Rig a Rod & Reel for Bream Fishing

by Jeff Jenkins
Bream fishing is fun for the whole family.

Bream fishing is fun for the whole family.

Bream fishing is a common method to introduce young people to fishing, and it's popular among everyday anglers. Bream tend to travel in large numbers, so it's not uncommon to catch 50 or 60 fish on one trip. Bream fishing requires a minimum amount of tackle, and you can use just about any tackle to catch bream, as long as the hook isn't too large. Anglers who land the most bream typically use lighter tackle. Using fine line, small weights and ultralight rods/reels improves you chances of catching more of these fun, fighting fish.

Set Up

Attach the #6 Aberdeen hook to ultralight line using a Palomar knot.

Place the #4 lead split-shot weight on the line approximately 12 inches up the line from the hook.

Bream fishing requires very little tackle compared to other types of fishing.

Tighten the split-shot weight gently onto the line using the pliers until it is secure and does not move.

You can find bream year round in depths of 5 feet to 15 feet.

Attach the 1" weighted round foam float onto the line at a position where the distance between the float and the hook is equal to your desired fishing depth.

Retrieve a live cricket and thread the hook through the cricket starting just behind the head and out through its backside.

Items you will need

  • Ultralight spinning rod-and-reel combo
  • 2-lb. to 8-lb. test line
  • 1-inch weighted round foam float
  • #4 lead split shot weight
  • #6 Aberdeen hook
  • Live crickets
  • Pliers

Tips

  • Using ultralight tackle makes for a more exciting fight when retrieving the fish, but light and medium rod-and-reel combos will work also.
  • Make sure the bait is lively at all times and change it when necessary.
  • Weighted floats make casting the light rig easier.

Warnings

  • Large hooks can be visible to the fish and deter them from taking the bait.
  • A sinker placed too close to the hook can also be visible to the fish and deter them from taking the bait.
  • Be careful when tightening the weight to the line. Overtightening can place undue stress on the line and cause line breaks.

About the Author

Jeff Jenkins is currently is the president of his own Web design firm and operates three popular websites in Arkansas. However, his true passion is writing. He maintains a column online and writes for various websites. Jenkins is a graduate of the University of Central Arkansas with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in computer information systems.

Photo Credits

  • female fishing image by JulianMay.co.uk from Fotolia.com