Gone Outdoors

How to Restore a Pop-Up Camper Trailer

by Lynda Altman

Restoring a pop-up camper trailer requires hard work. Most of the materials required are available at a local home improvement center or RV center. Fabric stores are a reliable source for clear vinyl fabric used in some pop-up camper trailer windows. Allow for a weekend or two to completely restore the pop-up camper.

Restoring a Pop-Up Camper Trailer

1. Open the pop-up camper and inspect the fabric and windows for leaks, tears, open seams and broken zippers. Mark the areas requiring repair with a pencil.

2. Use a darning needle and nylon thread to secure loose zippers and to repair open or torn seams.

3. Remove the damaged screen and window fabric by opening up the seams with a seam ripper. Lay the damaged piece on to new fabric. Trace the shape and cut out with scissors. Sew the new fabric into place using a darning needle and thread.

4. Use a fabric patch kit to repair leaks and holes in the pop-up camper trailer's fabric. Cut the patch ¼-inch larger than the damaged area. Use the glue included with the kit to secure a patch to the inside and outside of the damaged fabric.

5. Wash the pop-up camper and check for leaks. Allow to dry completely. Spray with a water repellent spray after the camper top has dried. Allow spray to dry.

6. Replace damaged cabinet hardware with new hardware. Check hinges for damage or rust. Replace hinges if necessary. Use household oil to lubricate hard-to-operate hinges.

7. Check cabinets for damaged wood. Fill in dings and nicks with wood putty. Add an updated look to the cabinets with a coat of exterior paint.

8. Use the floor scraper to remove old tile or carpet. Measure the floor space. Purchase enough peel-and-stick tile to cover the area.

9. Replace mattresses with new ones. Upgrade to innerspring or Sleep Number ® beds for a high-end renovation.

Items you will need
  • Scissors
  • Measuring Tape
  • Pencil
  • Seam ripper
  • Fabric repair kit
  • Clear vinyl fabric
  • Screen material
  • Needle
  • Nylon thread
  • Tile scraper
  • Cordless drill or screwdriver
  • Peel and stick tile
  • Mattresses
  • Wood putty
  • Paint
  • Paintbrush
  • Cabinet hardware
  • Hinges
  • Household oil or WD40
  • Spray on water repellent

Tips

  • Choose a day without wind or rain to apply the water repellent.
  • Purchase 10 percent more tile than you will need. This allows for errors and later repairs.

References

  • "Woodall's RV Owners Handbook"; Woodall's Publishing Corp.; 2005 edition

Photo Credits

  • Thinkstock/Comstock/Getty Images