Gone Outdoors

How to Repel Chickens

by Teresa Coogler

Chickens are wonderful creatures to have around your garden. They eat the bugs and slugs that would otherwise feast on your flowers and vegetables. However, chickens can also wreak major havoc. They love to dig hollows in the soil and take dirt baths. In the process of digging in the dirt, they can destroy the plants you lovingly planted. What can you do to repel chickens and get them to leave your garden alone? Here are a few tips that will convince the chickens to dig somewhere else.

Use some chicken wire to make a fence around the areas you want to protect. This is not very pretty, but will keep the chickens out of your vegetable garden and flower bed.

Put some chicken wire on the ground, around the base of the plants. The chickens will not like the feel of the wire on the bottoms of their feet, and they will avoid the area.

Instead of using mulch around your plants, use river rock gravel. Again, the chickens will not like how the rocks feel on their feet, and they will avoid the area.

Another chicken-repelling idea is to plant very close together, leaving no open spaces between items. If the chickens cannot easily get in between your plants and there are no open spaces of dirt where they can dig and scratch, they will no longer be interested in your garden and will leave it alone.

If nothing else works, try a motion-activated sprinkler. Anytime a chicken goes too close to your prize tomatoes, the sprinkler will turn on and he will get a bath. Chickens don’t like to get wet, so it won’t take long for them to learn to stay away.

Items you will need
  • Chicken wire
  • River rocks
  • Motion-activated sprinkler

Tips

  • If all else fails, you can always contain your chickens in an enclosed pen.
  • If you want to have total control over chickens and the areas they have access to, a chicken tractor will work well for you. A chicken tractor is like a small, portable pen you can move around your yard.

About the Author

Teresa Coogler is a writer specializing in topics such as pets and home and garden. She holds a bachelor's degree in biological sciences and a Master of Arts in secondary education from Marshall University.