How to Put Together Side Release Buckles

by John Collins
Side release buckles are often used on backpacks.

Side release buckles are often used on backpacks.

Side release buckles are an efficient way to secure items and are quickly released with one hand. Many luggage items feature side release buckles, and they offer a method that rarely sticks or is difficult to use, whereas zips may get stuck.

Take the end of the strap (ensuring there are no twists present) and the end of the buckle with two bars, and then thread the strap from the bottom side of the buckle up between the main body of the buckle and the innermost bar.

Pass the strap over the top side of the innermost bar, and thread it back down between the inner bar and the outermost bar. This is the end of the buckle that allows you to adjust the length of the strap if needed.

Take the opposing strap (ensuring there are no twists present) and the three-bar slide, and pass the strap through the gap on one side of the slide, up towards the convex side and over the middle bar, then back down through the gap on the other side. Slide the piece down the strap so it is about 6-8 inches from the end.

Take the same strap (still ensuring there are no twists present) and the end of the buckle with one bar, pass the strap from the bottom side of the buckle, and up through the space between the bar and the main body of the buckle. Lay the end of the strap back on itself to form a loop around the bar on the buckle.

Secure the strap by passing it through the three-bar slide in reverse. The three-bar slide can be moved up the strap towards the buckle to keep it tidy if you wish, or further away to avoid a trailing end of strap.

Items you will need

  • Strap
  • Side release buckle
  • Three-bar slide (triglide)

Tip

  • If you wish to make the strap more permanent: Instead of using a three-bar slide, sew the end of the strap to itself after looping it through the buckle (make sure the stitching is strong and durable).

Warnings

  • Make sure the buckle is a similar width to the strap. Too wide and it may jostle around; too small and you won't be able to pass the straps through.
  • Make sure the straps and the buckle are of sufficient strength to hold the contents under force.

About the Author

In 2010 John Collins began writing on the blog for the London Academy of Media Film & Television. He is a qualified English teacher with a superior knowledge of vocabulary and grammar and holds a Bachelor of Science in marine sports technology from the University of Plymouth, England.

Photo Credits