Gone Outdoors

Paint Ideas for Aluminum Jon Boats

by Daniel Ames

A jon boat is a utilitarian vessel primarily used for hunting and fishing. It typically has few features other than three bench seats. Jon boats have flat bottoms and range in length from 10 feet to an average of 16 feet. Jon boats are meant for use on small bodies of water as large waves could easily swamp the vessel and cause it to sink. Because of their bare bones nature, jon boats are often customized by their owners. Custom paint jobs are quite common on aluminum jon boats.

Camouflage Paint

Jon boats are commonly used as hunting platforms. With their flat hull, jon boats are much more stable in the water than their V-hull counterparts. Because of this stability, hunters, especially waterfowl hunters, often choose jon boats as their hunting boat. To blend into the surrounding land and water, a camouflage paint job is a good idea for waterfowl hunters. Spray alternating stripes of dark green, black and gray.

Flat Gray

For fishing on small bodies of water, jon boats serve as excellent vessels. They are used in very shallow water. To prevent the intrusion a brightly-colored boat that will scare away fish life, consider painting your jon boat a flat gray, which will blend in with the water color and make it easier to catch fish.

Bright Steel

Jon boats feature wide transoms and are capable of holding powerful motors. Some boating enthusiasts like to put large outboard motors on their jon boats and turn them into high-speed vessels. For this type of operation, a corresponding paint job should feature bright steel paint, which is the same kind of paint used on race cars and drag racers. A high-speed jon boat painted a bright steel color completes the ensemble targeted by a big motor and a low-profile boat.

About the Author

Dan Ames has been a professional writer for nearly 20 years and has won national and international awards for creativity. He received a journalism degree from the University of Wisconsin and has been published in a variety of magazines, journals and websites, including eHow and Pluck on Demand.

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