Moultrie Game Camera Set Up Instructions

by Patrick Nelson
It's often possible to identify small animal trails over large animal trails because the upper level brush will cover the trail.

It's often possible to identify small animal trails over large animal trails because the upper level brush will cover the trail.

Moultrie game cameras capture images of live game like deer in the wild. They can be used to identify feeding patterns for hunters and to pinpoint the type of game that areas of the wild attract. Some users put them up in lieu of hunting, simply to photograph game. The devices use motion sensing technology to capture images, even overnight through night vision. Correct setup is important to avoid false readings and to get the best images.

Survey the area to mount the camera. Try to find a location where wildlife feed or pass through. Look for trampled grass, water sources or evidence of trails. It's often possible to identify small animal trails over a large animal, or human trails because the upper level brush will cover the trail---coyotes, for example, need less headroom than a human or deer. Look for prints.

Open the battery door by removing the thumb screws and sliding the door open. Insert the batteries and an SD (secure digital) card.

Install the camera on a solid tree by attaching it with velcro or the mounting strap that comes with many models. Point it at areas of game use or along the trail---in the opposite direction of the water source, for example, to catch wildlife heading for a drink. Use solid trees to avoid wind movement that can cause false readings. Don't point the camera into the sun.

Turn the Moultrie game camera's power switch to the "On" position. Press the Mode button repeatedly until "Automatic" appears on the screen. The camera will take images at its automatic setting---640 x 480 pixels, which is perfect for computer screens.

Items you will need

  • 6 Alkaline D batteries
  • SD Card

About the Author

Patrick Nelson has been a professional writer since 1992. He was editor and publisher of the music industry trade publication "Producer Report" and has written for a number of technology blogs. Nelson studied design at Hornsey Art School.

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