Gone Outdoors

How to Make Waterproof Socks

by Erin Watson-Price

Waterproof socks repel external moisture and keep your feet dry, a particularly useful property if you enjoy water sports like kayaking, canoeing or rafting. Rather than spending money to purchase expensive waterproof socks from the store, you can simply use a waterproofing fabric spray to turn your athletic socks into the perfect water sport socks. However, there is one thing to consider before proceeding. While waterproofing your socks will repel external moisture, it will also prevent the socks from wicking away the sweat from your feet. So if you have problems with excessively sweaty feet, waterproof socks will not provide you with any extra comfort.

1. Purchase a waterproofing spray formulated specifically for clothing. Most outdoor or sporting goods stores sell a variety of waterproofing supplies. Waterproofing sprays for outdoor furniture, tents or backpacks will make the socks stiff and uncomfortable.

2. Choose a well ventilated area to work.

3. Place a sock on a paper towel roll. Hold the spray can 6 inches way from the sock and apply in even strokes from the tip of the toe to the cuff all the way around the sock. If you have excessively sweaty feet, you can avoid the sole of the sock. The sock will still wick away the sweat, but once the insoles of your shoes become wet, so will your socks.

4. Apply multiple coats, if desired. However, the more coats you apply, the more the socks may stiffen. Try on the socks between each coat to test the softness and pliability.

5. Allow the spray to dry for the manufacture’s recommended amount of time before washing or wearing.

Items you will need
  • Waterproofing spray
  • Paper towel roll
  • Pair of athletic socks

About the Author

Transplanted Yankee Erin Watson-Price lives in Birmingham, Ala., and has been writing freelance articles since 1997. She worked as writer/co-editor for Coast to Coast Dachshund Rescue's newsletter, "The Long and the Short of It." In 2007 she obtained a certification as a copy editor. Watson-Price holds a Bachelor of Arts in creative writing from Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville.

Photo Credits

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