Gone Outdoors

How to Make a Cheap Deer Hunting Blind

by Charles Dodd White

A quality deer hunting blind does not have to cost a lot of money. With some basic building supplies, you can put together a durable structure that will last for several hunting seasons. For less than $50 you can get the basic supplies to build a blind intended for hunting from the ground. This will not only save you money, but provide a blind that you can easily move from one position to another. This added mobility is also a money saver because it means you won't need to build multiple permanent stands.

1. Cut the 2-by-4s into 12 lengths of 3 feet each. These sections will serve as the three main horizontal structures of the deer blind: the base, the gun rest and roof.

2. Build the base by setting four of the 3-foot pieces in a square and nailing them together. The base will provide overall stability to the entire deer blind, so nail the pieces firmly together.

3. Erect a 6-foot vertical 2-by-4 beam at each corner of the base and nail it in place, making sure all edges are flush.

4. Build in the gun rest among the vertical posts. Determine the best height for the gun rest by figuring where the gun will go when you're seated inside the blind. About 3 1/2 feet is usually right. Build the gun rest structure as you did the foundation square.

5. Add a roof by nailing in another square structure at the top of the vertical posts. Nail in a cut piece of plywood to serve as the deer blind's ceiling.

6. Hang camouflage netting from the top of each side of the roof and staple it in place, letting it drape over the entire length of the blind structure. Slit an area on each side at the height of the gun rest so that you can easily place the gun barrel through when a shooting opportunity presents itself.

Items you will need
  • 2-by-4 beams
  • Sheet of plywood
  • Hammer
  • Nails
  • Saw
  • Staple gun
  • Camouflage netting

Tip

  • It is unnecessary to build an entryway into the blind. Enter the blind by placing it on its side, going through the bottom and placing the blind back in a vertical position.

About the Author

Charles Dodd White has written freelance articles for five years. His fiction and nonfiction have appeared in "Night Train," "Pequin," "Rain Taxi" and others. He holds a Master of Arts from Western Carolina University in English and a Master of Fine Arts from Spalding University in writing.

Photo Credits

  • whitetail deer buck image by Bruce MacQueen from Fotolia.com