How to Install a Bike Kickstand

by Wade Shaddy
Adjust kickstands so the bike has a slight angle.

Adjust kickstands so the bike has a slight angle.

Cruisers, comfort, vintage and kids’ bikes feature kickstands. And practical utility bikes with baskets or racks may work best with kickstands. Mountain, road and high-end bikes usually skip the kickstand to save weight and remain streamlined. A simple, frame-mounted kickstand is the most common.

1. Inflate the tires to the recommended pressure, printed or embossed on the side of the tire. This ensures that your bike is the right height when you install the kickstand.

2. Separate the clamp from the kickstand. The clamp is a plate with a large bolt penetrating it.

3. Position the kickstand under the bike, directly behind the point where chain stays meet the bottom bracket. The plate should span the space between the chain stays. There may be two ridges the kickstand fits between on the bottom.

4. Place the clamp with its bolt pointing straight down on top of the chain stays, directly above the kickstand plate. Thread the bolt with your fingers into the threaded hole in the kickstand and tighten it finger tight.

5. Spin the pedals with one hand to check for contact with the kickstand. Check for cables that might be pinched or caught and adjust them as needed, repositioning the kickstand if necessary. Open the kickstand and allow it to support the bike. Reposition the kickstand if the angle, or position is insufficient to support the bike.

6. Close the kickstand. Snug the clamp bolt using a 14 mm wrench. Get on the bike and pedal it in an area out of traffic. If you hear tapping or the kickstand is obviously rubbing on the pedal or your foot, adjust as needed until the bike pedals smoothly and quietly. Tighten the bolt securely with the wrench when you are satisfied.

Items you will need

  • 14 mm wrench
  • Hacksaw (optional)

Tip

  • Some kickstands require trimming with a hacksaw. This type of kickstand has angled hash marks on one side. Cut the kickstand a section at a time, following the hash marks, until the bike stands securely.

Warning

  • Loose kickstands and water bottle cages can cause you to crash. Periodically tighten screws to secure them.

About the Author

Specializing in hardwood furniture, trim carpentry, cabinets, home improvement and architectural millwork, Wade Shaddy has worked in homebuilding since 1972. Shaddy has also worked as a newspaper reporter and writer, and as a contributing writer for Bicycling Magazine. Shaddy began publishing in various magazines in 1992, and published a novel, “Dark Canyon,” in 2008.

Photo Credits

  • Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images