Gone Outdoors

How to Grow Fishing Worms

by Contributing Writer

You can raise your own supply of fishing worms so you never again need to stop at a sports shop or convenience store before a fishing trip. Red wiggler worms are a good natural bait for plunking and drift fishing. Although smaller than the European night crawlers commonly sold as live bait, red wigglers are similarly tough enough to stay on a hook. Most importantly, red wigglers thrive in a simple container referred to as a worm bin. A worm bin can be any sturdy container that can keep the contents moist and allow some ventilation. Starter worms are available from garden stores, fishing supply stores and through mail order from vermiculture companies.

Make, adapt or buy a container for the worms and their food -- the larger the worm bin, the more food it can hold, allowing you to raise more worms.

Gather biodegradable bedding for the worms such as waste paper, fallen leaves, paper egg cartons or used pizza boxes.

Moisten the bedding thoroughly by hosing it down or soaking it in a bucket and then place it in the container.

Bury table scraps, spoiled fruits and vegetables or coffee grounds within the bedding in the bin.

Add the worms by gently pulling the wad of worms and any other material from the package and burying it in the bedding.

Moisten the bedding, let time pass and occasionally add more food scraps. Within a few weeks the worms will begin laying enough eggs in the bedding to replace the worms you pull out to use for your live fishing bait.

Items you will need
  • A container to use as a worm bin
  • Bedding
  • Food scraps
  • Red wiggler worms

Tip

  • Add pulverized egg shells with the food to encourage better worm reproduction.

Warning

  • Avoid feeding these food scraps to your worms: Meat, cheese, fat, oils, pineapple and citrus fruits.

References

  • Trout: The Complete Guide To Catching Trout With Flies, Artificial Lures, and Live Bait; John van Vilet; Creative Publishing Intl; 2008
  • Worms Eat My Garbage: How To Set Up And Maintain A Worm Composting System; Mary Appelhof; Flower Press; 1997