How to Disassemble a Shakespeare Spin Casting Fishing Reel

by James Clark

Shakespeare spincasting fishing reels are closed-face reels with a simple push-button operation to make casting the line virtually foolproof. Disassembling the reel is not much more complicated than using it for fishing. The housing removes in seconds and the internal gear mechanism can be separated into its component parts in a matter of minutes for cleaning, greasing and oiling.

Unscrew the reel cover with the hole for the line by turning counter-clockwise. Set aside the cover.

Remove the reel mechanism from the back of the reel housing.

Unscrew the handle by removing the screw through the center and set aside these parts.

Remove the metal spool cover by extracting the screw through the center.

Pull the spool with fishing line off the reel spindle and set aside.

Turn the spindle and gear assembly upside-down to look at the back of the reel, where a retainer clip installed on top of the spindel holds the gear mecanism in place. Remove this c-shaped clip with needlenose pliers.

Take time to study the orientation and sequence of the gears on the reel spindle before sliding them off the spindle.

Use the model number printed on the side of the reel housing to look up the schematic parts diagram for that particular Shakespeare reel. A list of schematics for Shakespeare reels by model number is linked in the reference section. These diagrams will aid in identifying different internal parts.

Remove gears one at a time, methodically, from the spool spindle, placing each part on a towel or blanket to prevent pieces from rolling around.

Set each gear next to the gear that preceded it in the order the parts come off the spindle. This will make life much easier when it comes time to reassemble the Shakespeare spincasting reel.

Items you will need

  • Shakespeare spincasting reel
  • Screwdrivers
  • Needlenose pliers
  • Large blanket or old towel

About the Author

James Clark began his career in 1985. He has written about electronics, appliance repair and outdoor topics for a variety of publications and websites. He has more than four years of experience in appliance and electrical repairs. Clark holds a bachelor's degree in political science.