How to Clean a Wild Hog

by Quinn Marshall
An adult wild hog can yield a hundred pounds or more of meat.

An adult wild hog can yield a hundred pounds or more of meat.

Wild hogs, sometimes referred to as wild boar, are native to Europe, Africa and Asia, and have become an established species in North America. Wild hogs can be legally hunted in most parts of the world, and are killed for their tusks, hide and meat. A wild hog must be properly cleaned before it can be cooked and consumed as food. Cleaning a wild hog on the field may be necessary if it weighs too much to transport.

Preparing

Scrub the wild hog's skin with warm water using an abrasive scrub brush to remove any debris and insects that may contaminate the meat. Rinse thoroughly with water using a bucket.

Insert the gambreal hooks into the hog's hind knee joints.

Thread cord through both gambrel hooks. Throw the cord over a sturdy tree branch, beam or post. Hoist the hog into the air so its anus is level with your shoulders.

Place a bucket beneath the wild hog to catch the internal organs as they fall.

Dip a whetstone in water and place it nearby so you can periodically sharpen your knife when necessary.

Skinning

Severe the skin of the hog from anus to neck using a sharp knife. Slice the circumference of the hog's neck and each of the hog's legs approximately six inches above the hooves. Slice vertically down the inside of the hog's legs to the vertical slice down the hog's stomach.

Peel the edge of the skin back from the slice down the hog's stomach and sheer at it with the edge of the knife while pulling the skin taunt. Work from the hog's anus downward. The skin should be removed in one piece.

Inspect for any missed sections of skin. If any skin remains, remove it using a knife.

Gutting

Cut the skin around the anus, being careful not to severe the intestines. The anus should be completely detached from the body. Do not damage the anus, or fecal matter may contaminate the meat.

Slice the stomach open downward from anus to ribcage. The internal organs will begin to fall out.

Pull the organs downward, severing any ligaments that may be holding them in place. Place the organs into the bucket and then remove the bucket from the working area.

Quartering

Remove the hocks using a hacksaw.

Severe the muscle around the hog's neck using a knife. Once the muscle is severed, use a hacksaw to cut through the hog's neck bone. Discard the head.

Stand so that you are facing the hog's back. Locate the center of the hog's pelvis; it's located behind where the anus used to be. Place a boning saw against the center of the pelvis and saw downward slowly. Once the pelvis splits into two pieces, saw more forcefully downwards through the center of the spine until the hog has been split into two pieces.

Items you will need

  • Bucket
  • Hacksaw
  • Bone saw
  • Water
  • Knife
  • Whetstone
  • Cord
  • Gambrel hooks
  • Butcher paper
  • Scrub brush

Tip

  • Process the wild hog out of direct sunlight if possible. Dispose of the hog's internal organs and head by burying them or leaving them in an empty field for wild life and insects to feed on.

Warning

  • Do not let the hog sit at room temperature too long or it may spoil.

About the Author

Based in New England, Quinn Marshall began her writing career in 2004. She was a featured writer for Laptop Logic and contributes to publications such as "Smashing Magazine."

Photo Credits