How to Clean a Remington 550-1

by Gus Stephens

The Remington Model 550 is a blowback-operated, autoloading .22 caliber rifle manufactured from 1941 through 1970. The rifle stood apart from other .22 autoloaders because its patented "floating chamber" automatically accommodated .22 short, long and long rifle cartridges mixed together in the same magazine tube. The Model 550's record of reliable operation from the limited blowback of a .22 caliber short was also a novelty. Over 750,000 550s were sold in its three-decade production run. The Model 550 featured a wood stock, a 24-inch blued barrel and a 16-inch magazine tube.

Disassembly

Determine that the rifle is unloaded.

Engage the safety by pulling the safety lever located on the right side of the receiver to the rear position so the red dot is no longer visible.

Remove the takedown screw located on the bottom of the stock in the center and separate the barrel from the stock.

Unscrew the receiver plug at the back of the receiver and remove the spring. Point the rifle straight up and the firing pin will slide out of the receiver.

Pull the bolt handle all the way back, give it a slight twist and lift the bolt handle out of the bolt. Slide the bolt out of the receiver.

Remove the takedown screw bushing from the bottom of the receiver. Push the magazine tube into the receiver as far as it will go. Stick a small screwdriver into the ejection port and pry out the recoiling chamber.

Cleaning

Attach a gun cleaning patch wetted with cleaning solvent to a .22 caliber cleaning rod and swab the barrel bore. Run several patches through the bore until the patches emerge with no discoloration.

Clean the bolt and firing pin assemblies with cleaning patches and solvent. Scrub away any dry powder deposits or residue with a bristle brush and solvent.

Coat all components with a light coat of gun oil. Run a gun cleaning patch lightly wetted with gun oil through the bore.

Reassemble the rifle.

Items you will need

  • Gun cleaning kit
  • .22 caliber gun cleaning rod
  • Small screwdriver

About the Author

Gus Stephens has written about aviation, automotive and home technology for 15 years. His articles have appeared in major print outlets such as "Popular Mechanics" and "Invention & Technology." Along the way, Gus earned a Bachelor of Arts in communications. If it flies, drives or just sits on your desk and blinks, he's probably fixed it.