How to Camp in Fifty Degrees

by Tessa Holmes
Fifty0degree weather is too warm for snow, but temperatures may drop quickly.

Fifty0degree weather is too warm for snow, but temperatures may drop quickly.

Camping is a recreational pastime for many families. Many campers target the summer or fall months for camping adventures because the weather is warm, and swimming and lying by the lake is quite possible. However, others may be tempted to pack up and sleep under the stars, even when the weather is a bit colder. Fifty-degree weather occurs in late fall and early spring, though it is possible for it to occur during winter months as well.

1. Wear appropriate clothing. Clothing should cover your ears, head, body, hands and feet. Bring a coat, earmuffs, hat, gloves, boots, winter pants and socks. As it warms up or if you keep moving, 50 degrees may start to feel comfortable. It is still important that you bring warm clothing with in case the temperature changes.

2. Bring food with you; don't rely solely on hunting or fishing to sustain you. Bring foods from all the food groups, but, if it is cold, eat more carbohydrates, as they break down faster and produce heat and energy more rapidly than proteins. Also, bring plenty of clean water; it is not a good idea to eat snow when you are cold, as it will take more energy and heat for your body to melt the snow into water.

3. Exercise before preparing for bed when camping in 50-degree weather. Run, do pushups or jumping jacks to get your heart pumping and to warm up your body. Set up a well-insulated tent, a sleeping pad and a sleeping bag.

4. Close the tent door before undressing. Take off any wet or damp clothes and wear warm, insulating pajamas. Do not leave your feet bare, but wear warm socks. Also, wear a hat while sleeping to keep you warm and to prevent you from getting sick.

5. Keep a thermos or insulated container of tea or hot cocoa in your tent. If the temperature drops or if 50 degrees becomes too cold for you, drink some of the warm liquid. It will warm you quickly. Also, keep a first aid kit with a spare blanket and a thermometer nearby. If you or anyone near you gets too cold and their core body temperature drops to 95 degrees Fahrenheit, they may be entering a hypothermic state and should be warmed immediately. Call for help if this happens.

Items you will need

  • Winter clothing
  • Sleeping bags
  • Sleeping pads
  • Food and water
  • Tent
  • Pajamas
  • Thermos

About the Author

Tessa Holmes has been writing professionally since 2007. Her short stories and articles have been published on Relevantmagazine.com and in the "Cypress Dome." She has worked with the "Florida Review." She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Central Florida.

Photo Credits

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