How to Apply for a NYS Pistol Permit

by Heath Robert
Owning a handgun in New York requires a permit.

Owning a handgun in New York requires a permit.

Owning a handgun is legal in the state of New York, but only after obtaining a permit from your local police or sheriff's office. Applying for a permit involves filling out paperwork, paying a fee and disclosing any prior criminal history. Your application will be denied if you have a history of arrest or conviction, if you fail to disclose your full criminal history or if you have a history of arrests for driving under the influence of alcohol. A department may also deny permits if it believes you are not fit for a permit.

Obtain a copy of the New York handgun permit application. The application is available at nyc.gov or at your local police station or county clerk.

Fill out the application entirely, using a computer or typewriter. New York requires the application to be typed. The application must also be complete, including name, address and date of birth.

Have the application notarized.

Return the paperwork to the police headquarters, county clerk or sheriff's office in the county where you live.

Have the department take your fingerprints. Only a licensed police agency may complete a fingerprint identification card.

Pay the application fee and the fingerprint fee, if applicable.

Wait to be notified about the outcome of your application, and then pick up your permit. The issuing agency will require you to put your thumbprint on the back of the permit, which you will take to the dealer when picking up your handgun.

Items you will need

  • Driver's license
  • Three recent passport-sized photos

Tip

  • To qualify for a pistol license in New York State, you must be at least 21 and be a resident of the county in which you are applying for the license.

Warning

  • It's very important to disclose your entire criminal history in the application, or it will be rejected.

About the Author

Heath Robert has been a professional writer since 2001. Covering news, politics and local communities, he has worked for daily newspapers across Colorado, including the "Columbine Courier" and the "Colorado Statesman." Robert holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in journalism and political science.

Photo Credits

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