Gone Outdoors

How to Adjust the Scope on a Pellet Gun

by Brielle Vance

Proper adjustment of the scope on a pellet gun is a simple process that will help ensure accuracy. Whether it is used for target shooting or hunting small game, the scope should be properly sighted in.

Set up several targets, each with a bull's-eye.

Stand 10 feet from the first target.

Use the gun's scope to aim at the bull's-eye and fire the gun.

Determine where the pellet hit the target. It should be centered below the bull's-eye. If it's not centered, adjust the windage by using a flat-head screwdriver to turn the knob located on the side of the scope. There may be a plastic cover over the knob that will need to be removed by unscrewing it. Turn the knob counterclockwise if the pellet struck to the left of the bull's-eye and clockwise if it is to the right of it. The shot should hit below the bull's-eye, about the same distance as it is from the middle of the gun's barrel to the center of the scope (usually 1 1/2 to 3 inches).

Adjust the elevation knob--located on top of the scope--if the point of impact is too low or too high. Remove the knob's plastic cover. Turn the knob clockwise to lower the shot or counterclockwise to raise it.

Aim at the next target's bull's-eye and fire the gun to verify that the scope is sighted in at 10 feet.

Move back to 10 yards from the targets and fire the gun while aiming at a bull's-eye. The shot should land a little higher but still be below the bull's-eye. It will remain centered from left to right.

Adjust the elevation and fire several more shots, as needed, to ensure the pellets land in the center of the bull's-eye. The pellet gun is now sighted in at 10 yards.

Items you will need
  • Pellet gun with mounted scope
  • Targets
  • Pellets
  • Flat-head screwdriver

Tip

  • If using a multiple-pump gun, always use the same number of pumps; otherwise, the point of impact will differ.

Warning

  • Always place targets in a safe area with a backstop in place.

About the Author

Brielle Vance is a technical writer with a journalism background. After earning a Bachelor of Science in communication from Ferris State University, she completed an internship for the college's technology assistance center. As a journalist, Vance has worked in positions such as reporter, photographer, community editor and copy editor/page designer.